On Thursday, Senator Michael O. Moore (D-Millbury) formally called upon the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) and the Council of State Governments (CSG) to act on gun violence in the United States.

“As state legislators, we not only have the opportunity to advance bills in our respective legislatures, but also to promote progress at the federal level on collective issues such as gun violence,” said Senator Moore who also serves as Senate Chair of the Joint Committee on Public Safety and Homeland Security. “There is tremendous potential to advance commonsense laws at the federal level such as background checks, licensing requirements and firearm restrictions— including a renewal of the assault weapons ban.”

Senator Moore’s request comes in the wake of the recent shootings in El Paso and Dayton, as well as the recent violence in Philadelphia that resulted in multiple injuries to law enforcement officers responding to the scene. A recent Fox News poll conducted this week indicates that 67% of respondents support a federal ban on assault weapons.

To complement existing firearms laws in the Commonwealth, Senator Moore has filed legislation to help promote education and raise awareness about hate crimes and incidents of bias in our public schools. A separate Moore-sponsored initiative would help provide members of the law enforcement community with the tools needed to carry out their mission to protect the public.

“This is not a partisan issue,” said Moore. “As a proud Democrat, I have long supported the rights of law-abiding gun owners and understand the importance of protecting and preserving our Second Amendment rights from infringement. However, the widespread violence that has plagued our Nation is unacceptable and should be of concern to all Americans.”

Senator Moore has been an active member of both national organizations since joining the Massachusetts Senate in 2009. Currently, Moore serves as a Policy Working Group Member on the NCSL Law, Criminal Justice and Public Safety Standing Committee.